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flylikeaneagle
08-03-2005, 01:36 PM
How did you learn how to do your current job? Do you think this method is the best way to show someone how to do that job? Given the diversity of what we all do, and the fact many of us are starting careers, I wonder how we learn to work.

Kristyn
08-03-2005, 02:13 PM
It was a combination of college and internship experience. There is always new things to learn with each job, but at least previous experience helps set you up for the challenge. :)

biodork
08-03-2005, 02:29 PM
I wanted to say that college AND my job trained me, but really ALL of my lab skills were learned at work. The only thing I learned from school was some info that helped me understand the procedures (which for half of them I still don't understand anyways)

HereComes30
08-03-2005, 02:39 PM
There are days that I think a chimp could do my job and could train others how to do it as well. It seems that mind numbing and brainless at times.

wordsmith
08-03-2005, 03:43 PM
Kind of a mixed bag. There's no way to learn to report/interview people without just doing it. You can't learn it in a classroom, because so much of it is just getting a feel for winging it and observing and switching tacks as you go if need be. It's an acquired thing you really only learn well by experience, and I'm sure the other journalists will agree.

I could say that in my schooling, I learned to write. But, I don't think that's really true. You can hone your writing, which I did under various instructors and writers through my schooling, but you can either write or you can't. My schooling did teach me a lot about refining my writing, though, and did more to teach me about editing than anything else. but it's all still a continual process.

My photography is totally untrained. That's why it's so hit and miss.

Mad Dawg
08-03-2005, 04:00 PM
I put other because, while my degree may have prepared me for this field, the way I learned to do my job was by being thrown to the wolves. Trial by fire, if you prefer. Sink or swim.

ACP
08-03-2005, 06:01 PM
I am in a management development program in a medium sized business (1200 employees). The skills I have come from school, and working while in college.

winneythepooh7
08-03-2005, 06:32 PM
Most of what I learn (and I must emphasize that I am constantly learning and growing) is through experience. Not anyone can be a Social Worker, I honestly believe, and every population worked with is different. I primarily have worked with adults with severe mental illness, so I know nothing about services that are available for children, for example. I also feel that my graduate education was extremely valuable, and having a Master's degree definately sets us apart from say, Case Managers, and your basic counselor or human services worker. There is a lot you learn about yourself in grad school, and how stuff you do may cause harm to your clients. I also think that I learn a lot from my supervisor and other colleagues in my field, and especially, my population. It's almost like "getting therapy" when I go for my weekly supervision.

SmilesSoSweet
08-04-2005, 12:43 AM
I interned while in college. I majored in Landscape Architecture. I had to be working on the degree in order to intern for a firm. Once I graduated I learned a heck of a lot more in the office than at school, but without school, I couldn't work in the office.

winneythepooh7
08-04-2005, 06:31 AM
I interned while in college. I majored in Landscape Architecture. I had to be working on the degree in order to intern for a firm. Once I graduated I learned a heck of a lot more in the office than at school, but without school, I couldn't work in the office.

Good observation. It is also known in my field that an internship experience is not the same thing as real, live working experience. I never understood it until they hired the new Social Worker at my job who only has internship experience and this is her first actual job in the social work field ;).