PDA

View Full Version : Most random and vague question EVER! :p



*K10*
05-02-2006, 12:13 PM
Okay so... I'm *considering* going back now and finishing my degree. I have my AA and I feel like maybe it's time to figure out what I want to do with my life! :p

My question for all you highly intelligent college grads... knowing what you know now - after having graduated and been out in the workforce for some time. What degree/profession is the most sought after (by employers and today's professional world). I know healthcare is huge - and while directly I'm not interested in that - indirectly might be an option. Two fields I *might* consider are Information Systems (CIS or MIS) or Accounting (some form or another). No reason to confine your answer to those fields I just thought I'd put them out there incase they might hold some correlation.

My second question, what degree or career field do you think is the most versatile!? I.e., what would take me anywhere I want to go... secluded mountains in Montana, active New York City, foreign exchange in Paris or just an average life here in the good ole Midwest!? Is there such a career?! Or is it possible almost any career holds those options if you make it happen!?

While I know what I'm interested in (sorta) I also refuse to go back and finish (spend the money, time and energy to do so) and not get something that is REALLY going to move my life forward. So... ANY thoughts, ideas and/or suggestions are appreciated! :)

thanks!

wordsmith
05-02-2006, 12:31 PM
I fully expect the kicking the sh*t out of wordsmith to begin upon this assertion, but I still hold that English is the most versatile college major that exists. "Sought after?" Don't know about that, because most degrees that are sought after are specialized ones...but then you decrease your versatility, of course. But if not actively sought after, it still provides the base for a particularly broad range of career options...broader than many other majors will prepare you for.

To answer your other question of what's a job that can take you anywhere? Well, in a word, journalism...In theory, anyhow. Montana, NYC, Paris, the Midwest, etc. all have it. The tradeoff for its versatility and adaptability, of course, being that the pay is nothing to write home about.

and1grad
05-02-2006, 12:38 PM
I'm not sure versatility is what you want to consider in a major. Versatility essentially means "general" in terms of majors. Nobody gets an interview if their resume says that they have a degree in "Science." Knowing what I know, I would suggest that you make more of an effort on figuring out what it is you want to do in school. From there you can figure out how it translates into the workforce.

pisces2473
05-02-2006, 12:41 PM
As someone who's getting an MS in health care administration, I will say that if you decide pursue health care, make sure you get some kind of technical component--like you mentioned in your post above. I'm looking at jobs now and there's things that need a health care degree, but they also want someone who knows certain types of computers, programs, etc. I don't really have any of those, so hopefully I won't be too screwed.

What I'd suggest is look at jobs online, read what they are looking for, etc--that should give you the best idea about what you might need to know to work in a certain field, and then that will help guide you about what to study in college.

That being said, general liberal art degrees (like American Studies, English, History) are not horrible choices either! :) Good luck.

PVD99
05-02-2006, 12:44 PM
Engineering
Finance
Accounting

Aside from the medical field, I think those are three big ones. I have an MIS degree and I think it's a good degree, but it doesn't really translate into a specific job because it isn't technical enough. (or it wasn't at my school - it focused more on the business side) I do use some of my MIS skills on the job such as database development and systems troubleshooting, but I work in Finance.

wordsmith
05-02-2006, 01:00 PM
I'm not sure versatility is what you want to consider in a major. Versatility essentially means "general" in terms of majors. Nobody gets an interview if their resume says that they have a degree in "Science." Knowing what I know, I would suggest that you make more of an effort on figuring out what it is you want to do in school. From there you can figure out how it translates into the workforce.

There are fields, though, where versatility is highly valued (such as mine), so I wouldn't knock it as a whole. It's also an asset if it's important to a person to have an adaptable skill set for a wide range of career options...not everyone wants or needs that, but for some of us, it's invaluable.

Kitty
05-02-2006, 01:18 PM
As far as sought after..I'd say engineering or computer science. However, I don't really think you should get a major based on what employers are seeking.

Also, I think personality/character/etc. plays more of a role than your major.

wordsmith
05-02-2006, 01:23 PM
Not to mention innate skills and talents. Which you can of course showcase with your selection of major.

Kitty
05-02-2006, 01:24 PM
Yup. So, what it boils down to is get a degree in what interests you.

wordsmith
05-02-2006, 01:30 PM
And suits your skills sets and allows you to hone them.

Winter Storm
05-02-2006, 01:35 PM
Versatile is subjective. I'd say a communications degree is very versatile as you can pursue advertising, public relations, television, film, broadcast journalism or marketing.

But this degree is hard to break into and many have had trouble finding and keeping jobs.

Many, however, would beg to differ.

wordsmith
05-02-2006, 01:44 PM
Yup, I would consider communications and English to be pretty similar in terms of versatility...it just applies to so many careers.

Kitty
05-02-2006, 01:48 PM
Well, ya know I only have good stuff to say about both those degrees ;)

*K10*
05-02-2006, 02:12 PM
"suits your skills sets" my skill set is the product of what I've been doing and it's not necessarily what I want to keep doing so using that as a jumping point doesn't really work for me. As far as figuring out what I WANT to do and then getting a job for that... well what I want to do is NOT WORK! :p

So... if I HAVE to work I want it to be something that can go anywhere and is widely available. Something that as a single 30 year old woman I can support myself and make a good living for said self. Something that will bring me respect and actually be a "career" instead of what I'm doing now that feels like a job and I keep waiting for my life to start.

I feel like moving somewhere now and looking for employment leaves me with looking for administrative... assistant work and I DON'T want to live like that. I envision having a job that will take me places (working off of my post "So confused" I'm trying to create the life for myself).

Maybe this all sounds like crazy talk to you all... but I feel like it's something I'm smart for considering before going back and working my butt off and getting myself in debt for.

I don't have a determined idea of what I want to do. I didn't wake up and say... I want to be a doctor or I want to go to school so I can research why the electrical components of a space shuttle make space travel possible. I just want a higher education that will afford me a comfortable life and is something that is a bit of a trade that I'll never have to worry about being obsolete but readily available pretty much anywhere.

does that help at all?

J-girl
05-02-2006, 02:16 PM
Why dont you get a college catalogue book and just browse through the various programs and check what suits you. Or you can browse the internet for more information on that program.

analogman
05-02-2006, 02:49 PM
This is might sound crazy, but you don't need to go to college to find a job that you can work anywhere that pays well. Become a tradesperson and work in construction. That is a job that pays well and is portable. As long as someone is constructing buildings, you can work there. This problem is there is a limited career span because you can't work construction as you get older.

I think a business college degree will be more portable than an engineering degree (depends on what type of engineering). Also, it seems that there is generally a trade-off between how portable your career is and how much money you make if you only have a college degree (lawyers and doctors can work anywhere after being licensed in a different state). Engineering pays more than business in general, but you are somewhat limited by location. For example, there are few geographic locations in the US where a semi-conductor process engineer can work.

I concur with the others. Choose something that suits your interests and pays what you deem acceptable. Doing something just because it pays a lot can be very miserable.

wordsmith
05-02-2006, 02:54 PM
This is might sound crazy, but you don't need to go to college to find a job that you can work anywhere that pays well. Become a tradesperson and work in construction. That is a job that pays well and is portable. As long as someone is constructing buildings, you can work there. This problem is there is a limited career span because you can't work construction as you get older.

This is true...and my dad's a contractor and still works hard labor and he'll be 60 soon. It keeps you in shape, so it's not as limited a career span as you'd think. He's in much better shape than somebody who's sat at a desk for 30 years.

He actually has a degree, too.

But, like anything else...you have to have it as a skill and a want. I wouldn't recommend skilled trades to somebody just because "Hey, you don't need a degree and it pays pretty well." You really do have to love it.

winneythepooh7
05-02-2006, 03:33 PM
Social Work. Social Workers are needed everywhere with every population imaginable. You can make a decent living as well if you play your cards right. However, I don't encourage just anyone to become a Social Worker. It's hard and it takes a certain kind of person. And even then there's times where it still sucks in every sense imaginable.

yankeeyosh
05-02-2006, 06:48 PM
Q 1. I say accounting, health care, and possibly teaching.

Q 2. Based on what I've been seeing, I am really starting to believe it's liberal arts. I never would have said that two years ago, but there are so many things that you can apply it to, and from what I see on QLC, it is definitely a true statement.

ebruening
05-02-2006, 06:53 PM
I am a secondary English teacher, and I'll tell you that my job is very portable. I can move pretty much anywhere and would be, theoretically, employable, pending individual state certification, of course. My job has a lot of benefits: free health insurance, days off throughout the school year, summers off, and room for lots of individual creativity. However, as winney mentioned about Social Work, I'd not suggest going into teaching for "summers off." My first year, which is coming to a close, has been more work and stress than I ever thought it would be. The pay isn't great, either :rolleyes:

grneyedmustang
05-02-2006, 08:15 PM
I have to agree with AnalogMan when he states that Business might be a good bet. Unless you are planning on going into management, generally an IT degree might not be technical enough -- and you might have to start out doing some shitty technical support gig, where people are asking you where their desktop is. That is -- if a company decides they will call you in for an interview -- cuz you'll get the "not enough experience" spiel a lot also.

Finance might be another "good" degree, if you like numbers. Don't choose a field because of the pay -- choose it because it's something you wouldn't mind doing for the next fifteen to twenty years.

Good luck!!!

zen_mistress
05-02-2006, 09:45 PM
Hi :)

You are in a similar situation to me, it seems.. I am looking to get some sort of graduate diploma as I am in dire need of a new career; I am a secretary and I hate it and find it very draining!

But also I have itchy feet left over from my 2 years in Europe and I would like to go back there at the end of this year. But like you I'm not sure about the portability of what I am thinking of doing either. I would like a new career but I also want to be on the move!

Perhaps you could do some online career/personality tests? They might help with determining interests, personality type and skills

C
~