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  1. #1
    Join Date
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    You are paid what you are WORTH

    I recently got into a disagreement with a friend when I made this statement, "You are paid what you are worth." I was fighting for my life during the next few minutes, but the rest of my thought process was, "... do not get held back by being upset with what you're earning now. An employed person has a much easier time finding better employment than someone on the dole, dodging collections calls. You may make more in the future and have a better job/career, but right now this is where you are, and have no worries about that. It does not define you unless you let it define you."

    I have friends who are underemployed (like much of America right now) and who I am afraid that the mentality of, "I am better than this," is poisoning their attitudes and will make it difficult for them to function.

    What's good advice to give to someone who may have an advanced degree (but no experience), who is grinding away in an entry-level job?

  2. #2
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    I find it very rare that even those of us who have been working with no gaps for years, feel we make what we are worth.

    You can't put a price tag on many jobs.

    You have to weigh the pros and cons though........are your bills paid? Do you have money left over to save? Does your job allow for flexibility? Offer benefits? Family friendly? Are you gaining experience and networking contacts?

  3. #3
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    Worth is very, very subjective.
    "Even when I've f*&%ed up, I've spun it into a learning experience that's brought me to bigger and better things."

  4. #4
    It's important not to confuse your "worth" as a person or even the intangible worth of your work with your monetary worth to your workplace. The latter is just your potential for bringing money into your company (or school, govt office, whatever) compared with others, who might work for more or less. That's what your pay is based on, in most cases. It doesn't always work out fairly or reflect your potential or education or worth to society. I suppose it's a frustrating idea to consider because people want to consider the whole package in evaluating their own worth, not just their monetary contribution. Someone with a PhD isn't going to bring any more revenue into Starbucks than a barista with a GED. And sometimes it's just unfair -- a teacher who works hard every night and develops innovative methods is not going to bring any more tax revenue into her school as a teacher who is lazy and works just hard enough to help her students pass the required tests.

    I guess what's important is just not taking your current situation or pay personally. It's not a reflection on your total worth or potential to contribute to society, just market demands for your services and the amount of revenue you are able to generate in your current position.

  5. #5
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    It could be argued that you are paid partially by your DEMAND but not your worth.

    There's a big difference. Water is something we all need. It's WORTH to us is much more than many many things. Without it, we couldn't survive. It's DEMAND though is lower because of supply. Diamonds are much more expensive (well...due to artificial supply) but when it comes to survival, it's not really worth anything to us.

    It can be a similar thing with jobs. Some jobs we NEED people to do (high worth) but may be paid less due to supply (lots of people willing to do it for cheaper to compete) and vice versa.
    Scott

    If practice makes perfect, and nobody's ever perfect, why practice?

  6. #6
    No job can ever pay you entirely what you're worth. If you want to unleash your full potential, you got to work for yourself. A job is just pigeon holing you to a specific role, no matter how high paying it is.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by AznHisoka View Post
    No job can ever pay you entirely what you're worth. If you want to unleash your full potential, you got to work for yourself.
    As someone who is married to someone who is self-employed, I could totally debate you on that. But that's a whole OTHER thread.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by winneythepooh7 View Post
    As someone who is married to someone who is self-employed, I could totally debate you on that. But that's a whole OTHER thread.
    I didn't say being self employed was a guarantee to anything. It's just one of the few opportunities you'll get to possibly unleashing your potential.

    When you're in a day job, you're not acting like your natural self most of the time, let alone using all your talents.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by AznHisoka View Post
    When you're in a day job, you're not acting like your natural self most of the time, let alone using all your talents.
    Again, something that is totally debateable and an extreme assumption.

  10. #10
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    Great advice, Sarahg. Thanks.

  11. #11
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    The self-employed rarely "work for themselves." They work for clients, customers, students, what have you. They still have people paying them/people to whom they must answer. I grew up in a household funded by self-employment. It's not a magic bullet.
    "Even when I've f*&%ed up, I've spun it into a learning experience that's brought me to bigger and better things."

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by wordsmith View Post
    The self-employed rarely "work for themselves." They work for clients, customers, students, what have you. They still have people paying them/people to whom they must answer. I grew up in a household funded by self-employment. It's not a magic bullet.
    Yup! Also, unlike most traditional employment, you do not have steady income coming in all the time. Often you can go months before bringing in a paycheck, and in many cases, have to pay bills related to the business and your own employees before you can take a paycheck.

    Not only that but it's a 24 hour-7 day kinda thing for many of the self-employed, that also can be extremely stressful and honestly, quite burdensome if there is family involved. (Not to mention again the financial stressors when there is family involved).

    Just because you are self-employed, does not mean your business is all about you.
    Last edited by winneythepooh7; 04-11-2011 at 07:14 AM.

  13. #13
    I've never heard of people being paid what they are worth. In Henderson I've been hearing stories of people who have Master's and Bachelor's degrees taking minimum wage jobs because they have no choice. I would guess the employed personis getting a job easier because they have immediate experience. It might explain why I haven't gotten a job yet. I've had this one guy tell me that I should be looking for something more than just a minimum wage job because of the degree I had. Somedays it feels like it doesn't matter though.

    I heard somewhere that the credit score might give people problems in getting the job they want. As for self-worth, I guess that kind of makes sense. If you have little self worth, you won't look your best and you won't get the better paying job. It's part of selling yourself to the employer.
    Last edited by Tony Luciani; 07-02-2011 at 11:07 PM. Reason: Thought of something new to add.

  14. #14
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    I just watched this movie on Netflix, "The Company Men". It's a film starring Ben Affleck and Tommy Lee Jones about corporate downsizing in the mid-2000s due to the crumbling economy. It does a good job of humanizing CEO's and other executives who get laid off. When they first get fired, they automatically assume that they can find a new job quickly with their "skills" in the $100,000+ range. As the months go by, they quickly realize that they aren't "worth" that much money to anyone. Affleck ends up taking a job hanging drywall for his brother-in-law just so he can pay some bills.

    Its a good film, especially since your first instinct is to say "who gives a shit" when a rich guy loses a job, but after a while you start to feel bad for them.

    If you are replaceable or expendable, you are not truly worth your salary to your company.
    "Nobody said it was easy, no one ever said it would be this hard, take me back to the start"

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Telemachus View Post
    If you are replaceable or expendable, you are not truly worth your salary to your company.
    There is a world of difference between being "replaceable" and being "expendable." Even the Pope can be replaced. We can assume that the principle here is that the more difficult you are to replace, the higher your pay tends to be.

    If your job is so pointless that it can be completely eliminated (ie, it doesn't even need to be replaced, which does actually happen), then yeah, you aren't worth your salary.

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