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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    DC
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    47

    Worth

    Quote Originally Posted by Telemachus View Post
    I just watched this movie on Netflix, "The Company Men". It's a film starring Ben Affleck and Tommy Lee Jones about corporate downsizing in the mid-2000s due to the crumbling economy. It does a good job of humanizing CEO's and other executives who get laid off. When they first get fired, they automatically assume that they can find a new job quickly with their "skills" in the $100,000+ range. As the months go by, they quickly realize that they aren't "worth" that much money to anyone. Affleck ends up taking a job hanging drywall for his brother-in-law just so he can pay some bills.

    Its a good film, especially since your first instinct is to say "who gives a shit" when a rich guy loses a job, but after a while you start to feel bad for them.

    If you are replaceable or expendable, you are not truly worth your salary to your company.

    Telemachus, I froze when I saw this preview for the first time. It's exactly what I'm trying to say. The highly educated that are struggling to find a job? That degree isn't worth much at that point. The person who's working in their study field and doing well? That degree is worth a lot. That former $100k person who can't find someone willing to pay them half that, or anything at all (unemployed) has a resume that isn't worth much.

    I don't mean this as a knock to anyone, I am talking about myself. I have been on a rollercoaster these past 3 years, but it's finally starting to brighten up.

    Worth is a dangerous word. But it comes up every time I speak to someone about what they feel they should be getting paid, what they are "worth."

  2. #17
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    KCMO
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    229
    It's not about being paid "what your worth"...humans are worth much more conceptually than their salaries. You are paid based on how well you can monetize your skills. And you monetize your skills through not just based on the skill itself, but through leverage, luck, hard work, determination, and various other factors.

    A guy who works really hard at building houses may not be able to monetize this skill as well as someone who never lays a hand on a tool but can consistently generate revenue for his company by engaging in stock trading for two or three hours a day. The first guy works a lot harder, but the second guy knows how to best convert his skill into money.
    Last edited by urban_achiever; 07-28-2011 at 08:22 PM.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    DC
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    47

    Base

    You expounded my point that I made to my friend, that even with all of those factors, your pay is what you are worth. Until you free yourself from your pay. However, the true underlying reason for my post is that salaries are meaningless, but for those who are searching, and looking for validation (and the ability to pay their bills!) the level of income/recognition/rewards is crucial.

    In my opinion, when you are able to make enough to take away the stress of money, you are truly free. And it doesn't matter how much that is, as long as money isn't the main focus of why you wake up and go to work every day.

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by downbutnotout View Post
    In my opinion, when you are able to make enough to take away the stress of money, you are truly free. And it doesn't matter how much that is, as long as money isn't the main focus of why you wake up and go to work every day.
    Making enough money to the point where it's no longer a stress-factor (i.e., not living paycheck-to-paycheck) makes sense to me.

    But let's face it - unless you're somehow independently wealthy, money will always be the prime motivator for people going to work. You'll be hard pressed to find an employer that pays people to pursue their hobbies, after all. I know it's a popular fantasy to have a job that you love so much you'd "do it for free," but I know quite a few people who love their jobs a lot but I'm pretty sure none of them would do it without pay.

    Also, there's a reason why so many jobs people would consider "fun" and "glamorous" usually don't pay very much (writing, acting, etc) - it's not that hard to find people to do them!

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    SMF
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    1,113
    Quote Originally Posted by downbutnotout View Post
    In my opinion, when you are able to make enough to take away the stress of money, you are truly free. And it doesn't matter how much that is, as long as money isn't the main focus of why you wake up and go to work every day.
    I don't think this is quite true. Even when one makes enough that money doesn't stress one out on a regular basis, one still has to go to work to make sure money stays a non-issue..

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    California
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    1,319
    Quote Originally Posted by downbutnotout View Post
    In my opinion, when you are able to make enough to take away the stress of money, you are truly free. And it doesn't matter how much that is, as long as money isn't the main focus of why you wake up and go to work every day.
    Not to disagree with your point, but the well documented cases of folks who win the lottery seem to contradict this assessment. There are numerous instances of people who are unable to handle the responsibilities of great wealth, and end up either losing it all or even committing suicide.

    Money isn't the answer, its just nice.
    "Nobody said it was easy, no one ever said it would be this hard, take me back to the start"

  7. #22
    Money gives you options. It doesn't take away the enormous responsibility of coming up with life values, and a purpose. But it gives you that freedom to come up with a life purpose, free of many constraints. Without it, you're gonna have to start with.. "I have to make a living. So realistically, my purpose is.." rather than "I have financial freedom. I'm passionate about doing..."

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    DC
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    47

    Well

    Quote Originally Posted by Telemachus View Post
    Not to disagree with your point, but the well documented cases of folks who win the lottery seem to contradict this assessment. There are numerous instances of people who are unable to handle the responsibilities of great wealth, and end up either losing it all or even committing suicide.

    Money isn't the answer, its just nice.
    Ok, that is a great point. They lost their direction because they completely lost their need to worry about money. I can see that.

    The other sickness is where you work to the bone and make enormous amounts of money, and lose sight of your family and your personal life. I would say it's akin to addiction. A high-functioning addict.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    On an island
    Posts
    15,836
    I agree with both those points mentioned.

    What good is making hundreds of thousands of dollars a year if you cannot enjoy it? Or you have job that works you to the bone and tears you up with stress and damages your family life?

    I also think it's pretty common, that the more people make, the more they will spend.

    Think about 2-income households too. Many people can well afford within their means, a mortgage and a brand new SUV because BOTH spouses work.

    What happens though if one spouse is no longer employed? You are headed to the poor house and the repo men pretty damn quickly.

    This is pretty common in my area at least, where you basically REQUIRE two incomes in order to own even a tiny, modest home.
    Last edited by winneythepooh7; 08-07-2011 at 01:11 PM.

  10. #25

    ofcourse it's subjective...

    you know some times someone can have a MA or something, and be only making 25k a year because... they have trouble looking for a good job because of the economy or something like that.
    Flower Cloud Girl

  11. #26
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    On an island
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    15,836
    Or because the majority of their $$$$$ goes to things like health insurance .

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