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  1. #16
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Queens County, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by winneythepooh7 View Post
    Note: I used the time adjustment regarding what to do if you have to go to an interview that cannot be scheduled before or after normal business hours.

    Not something to consider for a daily basis since it's clear that cannot happen.
    This is good advice for anyone on QLC who is working and looking to switch jobs. It's amazing how accommodating employers can be if they really need you as a candidate. I've interviewed with managers who were on Pacific Time but accommodated my time zone, and have also been offered to interview on Saturday, over lunch, and even after work. All I've needed to do each time was ask.

    Likewise, when I hire, I will go to great lengths to accommodate the candidate if I really need to fill the position. I've stayed at work until 7 PM once in a while just because a working person needs that time slot after work. If the candidate is who I'm looking for, I really don't mind *and they give better interviews, because they're not all stressed out and rushing around.
    "Whatever dramas are going on in my life, I always find that place inside my head where I see myself as the cleanest, tallest, strongest, wisest person that I can be." L. Staley

    "I don't know where I'm going from here, but I promise it won't be boring." D. Bowie

    If a Wal-Mart is a person, could it marry a Target and have a baby named Safeway? I hope so!

    Jimmy McMillan for NYC Mayor because all across the country, The Rent is too Damn High!

  2. #17
    You absolutely refuse to work more than 35 hours a week? Im not advising you to make 60-hour weeks a habit, but sometimes its necessary to stay late in order to get everything done and not feel absolutely panicked and scattered during the day.

    I dont get paid for overtime, either, because Im a salaried employee, but Ill stay late on occasion if it means finishing up my duties on time. Its really not that bad, and 35 hours is pretty lean compared to what most people put in.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    On an island
    Posts
    15,820
    I know, right.

    I have a kid, am married and usually put more hours in than that a week with my job.

    It balances out though.

    Some weeks are crazier then others.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Queens County, NY
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    I agree with you both. It's a bit more challenging, but I've been able to call employers and headhunters back, do phone screenings, and even attend interviews while working a salaried, senior-level position with a 45-hour workweek as "standard." 30-35 hrs/week is "part-time" for me, and when I switched to that at my old job, I had tons of extra free time to hunt and interview. The key, for me, was using that time wisely, and I really had to be organized with it, because I'm now at the level where I'm expected to prepare fairly detailed proposals for interviews.

    I realize the stock exchange schedule can be restrictive, but if you're only working 35 hours a week (or, 7 hours a day), it's not mathematically possible to exceed standard working hours in both the AM and PM. I, and many colleagues, have worked around far more restrictive schedules and much longer work days, both as interview candidates ourselves, and when interviewing others. When all else fails, there is the "24-hour stomach bug" to buy a candidate a full day for interviewing.

    It's always hard to make tough choices and worry whether you've made the wrong one. But as long as you do what's in your heart and what's right for you, things tend to have a funny way of working out in the end.
    Last edited by gemma-dahl; 01-13-2012 at 08:20 PM.
    "Whatever dramas are going on in my life, I always find that place inside my head where I see myself as the cleanest, tallest, strongest, wisest person that I can be." L. Staley

    "I don't know where I'm going from here, but I promise it won't be boring." D. Bowie

    If a Wal-Mart is a person, could it marry a Target and have a baby named Safeway? I hope so!

    Jimmy McMillan for NYC Mayor because all across the country, The Rent is too Damn High!

  5. #20
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    On an island
    Posts
    15,820
    Quote Originally Posted by gemma-dahl View Post

    It's always hard to make tough choices and worry whether you've made the wrong one. But as long as you do what's in your heart and what's right for you, things tend to have a funny way of working out in the end.
    Agreed.

    And before I get slammed for having a kid and working (has happened on here before!) I just wanted to indicate that I LOVE being able to have the opportunity to work.

    It keeps me sane.

    I do realize that everyone's choices when it comes to work, kids or not, are going to be different, so each person needs to do what is right for them and their lifestyle.

    Trying to cram a ton of stuff into such rigid hours however, is probably the major cause of stress in this OP situation.

    Personally, I sometimes go into the office (or coffee shop, or wherever) for a few hours before business hours traditionally start, and can get a ton done then because it's really quiet. I then feel less stressed out during the regular work day.

    I don't see it as putting in free work either, because I'm salaried, and as I mentioned above, it all tends to balance out.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Queens County, NY
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    1,529
    Quote Originally Posted by winneythepooh7 View Post
    I do realize that everyone's choices when it comes to work, kids or not, are going to be different, so each person needs to do what is right for them and their lifestyle.

    Trying to cram a ton of stuff into such rigid hours however, is probably the major cause of stress in this OP situation.
    Agreed! Overall, I think time management is a task everyone struggles with, and I'm certainly no exception. Whenever I feel pressure and stress, I check myself to see if I am adding to it unintentionally. Socializing too much is an example for me. Back in November, the OP noted she enjoys chatting/sharing stories with co-workers, and felt other posters should be more social/open at work. That would be fun, but isn't personally a good idea for me. While I attend happy hours, client dinners, and holiday parties with enthusiasm, I also get very, very off-track when socializing a lot during core hours, so I've had to put strict limits on that. Similarly, about 2 years ago, I realized I was losing time at work to posting on QLC and other forums, so I blocked them in the /hosts file of my Mac. My efficiency went up and my stress went down during my hiatus, so when I unblocked all my sites, I wasn't tempted anymore. On the other hand, I have friends who can jump from Facebook to forums to work tasks and back throughout the day w/out feeling rushed or getting off-track, and more power to them!

    With close time management, I personally find myself more efficient and relaxed because I'm not losing a half-hour here and 15 minutes there to unrelated tasks. It also means I can grab a few minutes when I'm caught up to make personal phone calls, stop by others' offices and say 'hi', refill coffee, etc. But my style isn't right for everyone, so it's up to the individual to determine the style that works best for them and suits the demands of their workplace.

    Of course, people might have exhausted their roster of time-management tricks, and still find that their job has unreasonable or unfair demands, a ridiculous workload, an abusive boss, or all of the above. In that case, they need to decide whether staying or moving on is the best option. It's always hard to advise people when I'm not in their shoes, because the "ideal job" varies so, so much from person to person and from situation to situation. I believe following our hearts is often the best idea.
    "Whatever dramas are going on in my life, I always find that place inside my head where I see myself as the cleanest, tallest, strongest, wisest person that I can be." L. Staley

    "I don't know where I'm going from here, but I promise it won't be boring." D. Bowie

    If a Wal-Mart is a person, could it marry a Target and have a baby named Safeway? I hope so!

    Jimmy McMillan for NYC Mayor because all across the country, The Rent is too Damn High!

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    1,230
    Dane---I do not 'refuse' to work more than 35 hours. I am generally in the office 45 - 30 minutes early each day....and work through my 'mandatory' lunch (as in we are legally suppose to take it and have to punch out/in for it...but what most of us do is punch out...and sit at our desks and continue working as we dont have time to go take a walk or get something to eat from a sub shop or something)

    If there is something especially daunting I have worked as late as 7pm.....I definitely go 'above & beyond' in my position as needed.

    Most of my work though, cannot be accomplished 'after hours' as state offices where I have to send things close----some at 430...some at 5....and when it has to be done the SAME day its given to you----staying late to file it the following day doesnt work. It means you didnt complete the task that HAD to be done same day.

    So for the most part, at the end of the day there arent things left over to work on for the next day.....items land on my desk DAY OF...and have to be raced around.

    As for the work that I am personally responsible for----Im 3 months OUT....so that my days are open to take care of these items that land and are fires. Which is consistantly.

    I hope that illustrates why working more hours does nothing----in addition to NOT being compensated for them. Im hourly. Ive asked to be salary, as I would end up working MORE hours for them (weekends, nights etc)---but they wont make me salary.

    As for the social aspect of my job----because of the amount of favors I have to ask of other people----thats the lubricant I use to pull on those favors...but on days when Im literally RUNNING in the office....I dont really speak to anyone----wave as I run by is about all they get....and later when its a smidge more calm....I hear from people how tough it must be....

    Bottom line, its a RIDICULOUS work load----and people waiting till the last NANO SECOND to give something to me and then blaming me when I cant get done what they need as there isnt sufficient time.

    When you send an Email out at 7pm NEEDING something from a state office....A)Im not at work and havent received your Email and state offices are closed....B)---they're not open early enough where if I came in early I could get this done in time for start of businesss (ringing of the stock market open bells) and C) even if I could get in touch....they take 3 DAYS to process the request being made.....so you would have had to ask 4 DAYS ago to get it for tomorrow.

    But----even so----Im blamed for it not being taken care of-----even though its IMPOSSIBLE.

    We've grown too much, and people need to plan ahead better....there has to be a shift, otherwise it will continue to be situations of FAIL and no possible way to accomplish what is being asked.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    On an island
    Posts
    15,820
    Well, then you need to do what you need to do.

    Bear in mind that to a certain extent, many work environments put "blame" on their employees with certain things.

    Being in social work, I see this A LOT and it's not really different anywhere I've worked.........it's just the nature of the field, where often the clientele I work with are so unhappy with themselves and their situation, they displace their anger onto me and others that work with them. Often their only sense of control is trying to micromanage myself and my colleagues.

    You can't personalize it.

    I've also had upper management as well as others who work in different roles who don't "get" my duties or how the "system" works try to pull this crap with me at one time or another.

    In the end though, we always do have the option to leave, which has been pointed out already here, and in other threads.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    the slippery slope
    Posts
    765
    It's either part of your job or part of your management's job to communicate and enforce the internal deadlines needed to meet the external ones.

    If you can't do that, and your boss(es) won't, then it sounds like a good time to be looking for somewhere else to work.
    The truth is, we know so little about life, we don't really know what the good news is and what the bad news is. - Kurt Vonnegut

  10. #25
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Queens County, NY
    Posts
    1,529
    For the OP's specific dilemma, I stand by previous advice as well. However generally, my advice is for anyone, and y'all are free to read it, not read it, take it or leave it. I won't be hurt, I promise!

    I'm just sharing what I do, BUT (for the fifth and final time a rhyme!) "it may not work for you." MFing poetry. I haz it.

    On a more serious note: It's exceedingly difficult to tell people what they "should" or "shouldn't" do in a situation, and there is no one-size-fits-all solution. That's why I tend to share "what worked for me," with the caveat that it isn't applicable for everyone. Since many posters say that an unsuitable work environment contributes to their QLC, I'd like to share a few resources I found helpful, and which might apply to others stuck at a career crossroads:

    Signs of Authority-Based Abuse Helpful for any QLC poster seeking to determine whether to leave a job or not.

    Earning Respect Speaks to what most psychologists consider to be respectful vs. disrespectful behavior.

    Emotional Intelligence and Business Guide for assessing whether a specific company treats workers well, or whether serious changes need to be made. Also helpful for anyone in management.

    Project Coordinator position description A great opportunity for anyone seeking to move out of an administrative or secretarial role, as it uses all the same skills, and is needed in every profession imaginable. This versatile role also provides a path of upward mobility to project management positions and other more senior roles, many of which pay very, very well.

    PMI Guide to Project Manager/Coordinator training and certification Great resource for anyone seeking a low-cost, low-risk career change. (I should caveat that many PM/PC jobs don't even require certification these days. Relevant skills and a willingness to learn can be enough.)
    "Whatever dramas are going on in my life, I always find that place inside my head where I see myself as the cleanest, tallest, strongest, wisest person that I can be." L. Staley

    "I don't know where I'm going from here, but I promise it won't be boring." D. Bowie

    If a Wal-Mart is a person, could it marry a Target and have a baby named Safeway? I hope so!

    Jimmy McMillan for NYC Mayor because all across the country, The Rent is too Damn High!

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